Talk Justice

 

talkjustice

It’s been a long winter hasn’t it? So long. I’m excited for spring and the new hope it brings to our hearts. I’m also so happy to begin a new series called Talk Justice!

My friend Amy Sullivan, writer of the amazing When More is not Enough, sparked thoughts about talking justice with our kids a few months ago when we were having a phone date. In the right context walking beside children and teaching them about justice issues from a young age, shapes them to be people who understand, empathize, serve, and love others.

 

I tried to put it off.

if you find this letter

 

Then a little volume came to my mailbox to be reviewed. If you find this letter, by Hannah Brencher. She was featured in our Craft for a Cause Issuu magazine! As the founder of the World Needs More Love Letters, the book is a beautiful unfolding of her journey to crafting love letters to strangers and leaving them all over New York City. Her little dream grew into something so much bigger than herself, and millions have been touched by the love letter movement. Learn more at her website.

 

Hannah had this struggle I know well.

She longed for God to use her fully, but she didn’t feel good enough.

God used her anyway.

 

Do small things. On repeat. And think about other people. ~Hannah Brencher

 

That is what we are going to do each week.

 

I hope you will join me here on Mondays, for the next three months, to Talk Justice. Not just for ourselves, but for the generation we are raising up. They can handle proximity.

I’m really excited about so many things. (I’ll keep them a secret for now, but especially about Summer Serve Play Groups with the Citizen Kid Book Series given to About Proximity.)

 

Also, you are good enough. My love letter to you… I hope every time I write.

 

 

 

 

 

 

his understanding

IsaiahThe month of January, I am joining a group of writers talking about risking rejection. Thank you to Amy Sullivan for encouraging us to move out of our comfort zones. You can read her risk and all the links to others here.

Last week, I sought to take a risk and say no (not an easy feat for me). I can’t say I was totally successful. I said no to one thing, while finding myself in another spot, as a substitute. I tried, does that count?

The next two weeks I will talk about risks that are intertwined with writing. Let’s be honest, I am a worrier and a doubter. Every day I hit publish on here or somewhere else I feel so vulnerable, I can barely breath. Also, I very much love writing.

There has been a lot of risk involved and an unbelievable amount of rejection.

 

My risk this week is trying again.

Last winter, Kids Can Press, Citizen Kids donated an entire set of books to About Proximity. They were unbelievably generous and believed in our message.

citizen kidI worked to put together a series of play groups involving the books. They were super fun; games, interactive activities, a big dose of families making a difference. I gathered up my proposal and met with someone at the public library. They have a wonderful auditorium space. I thought it might be a worthwhile addition to their summer offerings.

A week later I received a no. Saying no is hard for me. Receiving no is hard. I tend to think the worst of myself and my ideas. (This did not fit their themes.)

I packed up the books and slid them in their box under my desk. The great moral of how I did not give up never happened, because I did just that. I felt very sad and did not keep trying.

My risk rejection this week is to gather those books and the plans up again. I will commit them to God. If I don’t find a home for them, we will line my street and fill up my house. I can’t wait to write about them this summer.

 

His understanding when we are rejected is so great.

His ability to not grow weary of us and our hearts is so great. They are everything to him.

Earth Day Resources for Your Family

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Today is Earth Day!
images (1)CitizenKid a series of books inspiring kids become global citizens has added a new book to its collection Planet Ark: Preserving the Earth’s Biodiversity. 

earthEnvironmentally Themed Movies for Families

images (12)Visit Recycle City a computer game from the Environmental Protection Agency

images (2)Read OxFam’s Grow Method and booklet Fighting World Hunger at your Table

images (3)Consider bringing TerraCycle to your school or business

images (4)Use Preserve Products: Nothing Wasted, Everything Gained.

images (5)The Fruit Tree Planting Foundation is dedicated to planting fruitful trees and plants to alleviate world hunger, combat global warming, strengthen communities, and improve the surrounding air, soil, and water.

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Visit my Creation Care Board over on Pinterest. I spent way too much time last week trying to gather the best of the best ideas.

Visit my friend Leslie’s DIY Pinterest board. Leslie is a talented crapter (she up-cycles regular stuff into fun crafts).

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Head over to the website The Story of Stuff Project. They have thought provoking videos about creating a sustainable world.

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Read the story of creation with your family.

Genesis Chapter 1: In the beginning… God created all we have. I think we have a responsibility to care for it!

Check out some the great earth day books for kids above: The Curious Garden, Compost Stew, Curious George Plants a Tree, Michael Recycle, The Magic School Bus Climate Challenge, Fancy Nancy Earth Day is Everyday, Biscuits Earth Day Celebration, Gabby and Grandma Go Green.  

HAPPY EARTH DAY!

What is your family really great at when caring for the earth?